The Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind

The Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind

eBook - 2000
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At the heart of this classic, seminal book is Julian Jaynes's still-controversial thesis that human consciousness did not begin far back in animal evolution but instead is a learned process that came about only three thousand years ago and is still developing. The implications of this revolutionary scientific paradigm extend into virtually every aspect of our psychology, our history and culture, our religion -- and indeed our future.
"When Julian Jaynes . . . speculates that until late in the twentieth millennium b.c. men had no consciousness but were automatically obeying the voices of the gods, we are astounded but compelled to follow this remarkable thesis." -- John Updike The New Yorker
Publisher: Boston : Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2000
ISBN: 9780547527543
0547527543
Characteristics: 1 online resource (512 pages)
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Call Number: eBook

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Steve11
Sep 10, 2018

This is an outstanding book, a real explanation of what consciousness is and how it works and the history of its development. I gave it five stars only because I couldn’t give it six.

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RyMac92
Apr 23, 2018

Disappointing book. I know a lot of very inspirational people love this book, but I found the author extremely boring and not able to defend his thesis in the slightest. The origin of consciousness is a fascinating concept as is the author's idea that at some point man was not wholly conscious of our surrounding. Unfortunately there's just too much pseudo-science and gibberish here that he does not ever develop a well-structured argument. Just rambles all over the place.

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